L!nux D¡5t₹0

The following distributions match your criteria (sorted by popularity):

1. Manjaro Linux (1)
Manjaro Linux is a fast, user-friendly, desktop-oriented operating system based on Arch Linux. Key features include intuitive installation process, automatic hardware detection, stable rolling-release model, ability to install multiple kernels, special Bash scripts for managing graphics drivers and extensive desktop configurability. Manjaro Linux offers Xfce as the core desktop options, as well as KDE, GNOME and a minimalist Net edition for more advanced users. Community-supported desktop flavours are also available.

2. MX Linux (2)
MX Linux, a desktop-oriented Linux distribution based on Debian’s “stable” branch, is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. Using Xfce as the default desktop, it is a mid-weight operating system designed to combine an elegant and efficient desktop with simple configuration, high stability, solid performance and medium-sized footprint.

3. Linux Mint (3)
Linux Mint is an Ubuntu-based distribution whose goal is to provide a classic desktop experience with many convenient, custom tools and optional out-of-the-box multimedia support. It also adds a custom desktop and menus, several unique configuration tools, and a web-based package installation interface. Linux Mint is compatible with Ubuntu software repositories.

4. elementary OS (4)
elementary OS is an Ubuntu-based desktop distribution. Some of its more interesting features include a custom desktop environment called Pantheon and many custom apps including Photos, Music, Videos, Calendar, Terminal, Files, and more. It also comes with some familiar apps like the Epiphany web browser and a fork of Geary mail.

5. Ubuntu (5)
Ubuntu is a complete desktop Linux operating system, freely available with both community and professional support. The Ubuntu community is built on the ideas enshrined in the Ubuntu Manifesto: that software should be available free of charge, that software tools should be usable by people in their local language and despite any disabilities, and that people should have the freedom to customise and alter their software in whatever way they see fit. “Ubuntu” is an ancient African word, meaning “humanity to others”. The Ubuntu distribution brings the spirit of Ubuntu to the software world.

6. Debian (6)
The Debian Project is an association of individuals who have made common cause to create a free operating system. This operating system is called Debian. Debian systems currently use the Linux kernel. Linux is a completely free piece of software started by Linus Torvalds and supported by thousands of programmers worldwide. Of course, the thing that people want is application software: programs to help them get what they want to do done, from editing documents to running a business to playing games to writing more software. Debian comes with over 50,000 packages (precompiled software that is bundled up in a nice format for easy installation on your machine) – all of it free. It’s a bit like a tower. At the base is the kernel. On top of that are all the basic tools. Next is all the software that you run on the computer. At the top of the tower is Debian — carefully organizing and fitting everything so it all works together.

7. Fedora (7)
Fedora (formerly Fedora Core) is a Linux distribution developed by the community-supported Fedora Project and owned by Red Hat. Fedora contains software distributed under a free and open-source license and aims to be on the leading edge of such technologies. Fedora has a reputation for focusing on innovation, integrating new technologies early on and working closely with upstream Linux communities. The default desktop in Fedora is the GNOME desktop environment and the default interface is the GNOME Shell. Other desktop environments, including KDE, Xfce, LXDE, MATE and Cinnamon, are available. Fedora Project also distributes custom variations of Fedora called Fedora spins. These are built with specific sets of software packages, offering alternative desktop environments or targeting specific interests such as gaming, security, design, scientific computing and robotics.

8. Solus (8)
Solus is a Linux distribution built from scratch. It uses a forked version of the PiSi package manager, maintained as “eopkg” within Solus, and a custom desktop environment called “Budgie”, developed in-house. The Budgie desktop, which can be set to emulate the look and feel of the GNOME 2 desktop, is tightly integrated with the GNOME stack. The distribution is available for 64-bit computers only.

9. openSUSE (9)
The openSUSE project is a community program sponsored by SUSE Linux and other companies. Promoting the use of Linux everywhere, this program provides free, easy access to openSUSE, a complete Linux distribution. The openSUSE project has three main goals: make openSUSE the easiest Linux for anyone to obtain and the most widely used Linux distribution; leverage open source collaboration to make openSUSE the world’s most usable Linux distribution and desktop environment for new and experienced Linux users; dramatically simplify and open the development and packaging processes to make openSUSE the platform of choice for Linux developers and software vendors.

10. Zorin OS (10)
Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution designed especially for newcomers to Linux. It has a Windows-like graphical user interface and many programs similar to those found in Windows. Zorin OS also comes with an application that lets users run many Windows programs. The distribution’s ultimate goal is to provide a Linux alternative to Windows and let Windows users enjoy all the features of Linux without complications.

11. CentOS (11)
CentOS as a group is a community of open source contributors and users. Typical CentOS users are organisations and individuals that do not need strong commercial support in order to achieve successful operation. CentOS is 100% compatible rebuild of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux, in full compliance with Red Hat’s redistribution requirements. CentOS is for people who need an enterprise class operating system stability without the cost of certification and support.

12. ReactOS (12)
ReactOS is a free and open-source operating system based on the best design principles found in the Windows NT architecture. Written completely from scratch, ReactOS is not a Linux-based system and it shares none of the UNIX architecture. The main goal of the ReactOS project is to provide an operating system which is binary compatible with Windows. This will allow Windows applications and drivers to run as they would on a Windows system. Additionally, the look and feel of the Windows operating system is used, such that people accustomed to the familiar user interface of Windows would find using ReactOS straightforward. The ultimate goal of ReactOS is to allow people to use it as an alternative to Windows without the need to change software they are used to.

13. KDE neon (13)
KDE neon is a Ubuntu-based Linux distribution and live DVD featuring the latest KDE Plasma desktop and other KDE community software. Besides the installable DVD image, the project provides a rapidly-evolving software repository with all the latest KDE software. Two editions of the product are available – a “User” edition, designed for those interested in checking out the latest KDE software as it gets released, and a “Developer’s” edition, created as a platform for testing cutting-edge KDE applications.

14. Arch Linux (14)
Arch Linux is an independently developed, x86_64-optimised Linux distribution targeted at competent Linux users. It uses ‘pacman’, its home-grown package manager, to provide updates to the latest software applications with full dependency tracking. Operating on a rolling release system, Arch can be installed from a CD image or via an FTP server. The default install provides a solid base that enables users to create a custom installation. In addition, the Arch Build System (ABS) provides a way to easily build new packages, modify the configuration of stock packages, and share these packages with other users via the Arch Linux user repository.

15. deepin (15)
deepin (formerly, Deepin, Linux Deepin, Hiweed GNU/Linux) is a Debian-based distribution (it was Ubuntu-based until version 15 released in late 2015) that aims to provide an elegant, user-friendly and reliable operating system. It does not only include the best the open source world has to offer, but it has also created its own desktop environment called DDE or Deepin Desktop Environment which is based on the Qt 5 toolkit. Deepin focuses much of its attention on intuitive design. Its home-grown applications, like Deepin Software Centre, DMusic and DPlayer are tailored to the average user. Being easy to install and use, deepin can be a good Windows alternative for office and home use.

16. Antergos (19)
Antergos is a modern, elegant and powerful operating system based on Arch Linux. It started life under the name of Cinnarch, combining the Cinnamon desktop with the Arch Linux distribution, but the project has moved on from its original goals and now offers a choice of several desktops, including GNOME 3 (default), Cinnamon, Razor-qt and Xfce. Antergos also provides its own graphical installation program.

17. ArcoLinux (20)
ArcoLinux (previously known as ArchMerge) is a distribution based on Arch Linux. The development takes places in three branches – ArcoLinux, ArcoLinuxD and ArcoLinuxB. ArcoLinux is a full-featured distribution that ships with the Xfce desktop (as well as Openbox and i3 window managers). ArcoLinuxD is a minimal distribution that includes scripts that enable power users to install any desktop and application. ArcoLinuxB is a project that gives users the power to build custom distributions, while also developing several community editions with pre-configured desktops, such as Awesome, bspwm, Budgie, Cinnamon, Deepin, GNOME, MATE and KDE Plasma. ArcoLinux also provides various video tutorials as it places strong focus on learning and acquiring Linux skills.

18. Linux Lite (21)
Linux Lite is a beginner-friendly Linux distribution based on Ubuntu’s long-term support (LTS) release and featuring the Xfce desktop. Linux Lite primarily targets Windows users. It aims to provide a complete set of applications to assist users with their everyday computing needs, including a full office suite, media players and other essential daily software.

19. FreeBSD (22)
FreeBSD is a UNIX-like operating system for the i386, amd64, IA-64, arm, MIPS, powerpc, ppc64, PC-98 and UltraSPARC platforms based on U.C. Berkeley’s “4.4BSD-Lite” release, with some “4.4BSD-Lite2” enhancements. It is also based indirectly on William Jolitz’s port of U.C. Berkeley’s “Net/2” to the i386, known as “386BSD”, though very little of the 386BSD code remains. FreeBSD is used by companies, Internet Service Providers, researchers, computer professionals, students and home users all over the world in their work, education and recreation. FreeBSD comes with over 20,000 packages (pre-compiled software that is bundled for easy installation), covering a wide range of areas: from server software, databases and web servers, to desktop software, games, web browsers and business software – all free and easy to install.

20. Ubuntu Kylin (24)
Ubuntu Kylin is an official Ubuntu subproject whose goal is to create a variant of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users using the Simplified Chinese writing system. The project provides a delicate, thoughtful and fully customised Chinese user experience out-of-the-box by providing a desktop user interface localised into Simplified Chinese and with software generally preferred by many Chinese users. Ubuntu Kylin was originally shipping with Ubuntu’s Unity desktop, but starting with version 17.04, it was replaced with a custom desktop called UKUI (based on MATE).

21. Peppermint OS (25)
Peppermint OS is a Lubuntu-based Linux distribution that aims to be lightning fast and easy on system resources. By employing its Site Specific Browser, Peppermint integrates seamlessly with cloud and web-based applications. The distribution’s other features include automatic updates, easy step-by-step installation, sleek and user-friendly interface, and increased mobility by integrating directly with cloud-based applications. The distribution employs a hybrid LXDE/Xfce desktop environment, mixing LXDE’s lxsession with Xfce’s panel and application menu.

22. SparkyLinux (26)
SparkyLinux is a lightweight, fast and simple Linux distribution designed for both old and new computers featuring customised Enlightenment and LXDE desktops. It has been built on the “testing” branch of Debian GNU/Linux.

23. PCLinuxOS (27)
PCLinuxOS is a user-friendly Linux distribution with out-of-the-box support for many popular graphics and sound cards, as well as other peripheral devices. The bootable live DVD provides an easy-to-use graphical installer and the distribution sports a wide range of popular applications for the typical desktop user, including browser plugins and full multimedia playback. The intuitive system configuration tools include Synaptic for package management, Addlocale to add support to many languages and Mylivecd to create a customised live CD.

24. Mageia (29)
Mageia is a fork of Mandriva Linux formed in September 2010 by former employees and contributors to the popular French Linux distribution. Unlike Mandriva, which is a commercial entity, the Mageia project is a community project and a non-profit organisation whose goal is to develop a free Linux-based operating system.

25. Archman GNU/Linux (30)
Archman GNU/Linux is an Arch Linux-based distribution which features the Calamares system installer and a pre-configured desktop environment. Archman also features the Pamac package manager to make installing new software easier.

26. Puppy Linux (34)
Puppy Linux is yet another Linux distribution. What’s different here is that Puppy is extraordinarily small, yet quite full-featured. Puppy boots into a ramdisk and, unlike live CD distributions that have to keep pulling stuff off the CD, it loads into RAM. This means that all applications start in the blink of an eye and respond to user input instantly. Puppy Linux has the ability to boot off a flash card or any USB memory device, CDROM, Zip disk or LS/120/240 Superdisk, floppy disks, internal hard drive. It can even use a multisession formatted CD-RW/DVD-RW to save everything back to the CD/DVD with no hard drive required at all.

27. Slackware Linux (35)
The Official Release of Slackware Linux by Patrick Volkerding is an advanced Linux operating system, designed with the twin goals of ease of use and stability as top priorities. Including the latest popular software while retaining a sense of tradition, providing simplicity and ease of use alongside flexibility and power, Slackware brings the best of all worlds to the table. Originally developed by Linus Torvalds in 1991, the UNIX-like Linux operating system now benefits from the contributions of millions of users and developers around the world. Slackware Linux provides new and experienced users alike with a fully-featured system, equipped to serve in any capacity from desktop workstation to machine-room server. Web, ftp, and email servers are ready to go out of the box, as are a wide selection of popular desktop environments. A full range of development tools, editors, and current libraries is included for users who wish to develop or compile additional software.

28. Ubuntu MATE (36)
Ubuntu MATE is a desktop Linux distribution which aims to bring the simplicity and elegance of the Ubuntu operating system through a classic, traditional desktop environment – the MATE desktop. MATE is the continuation of the GNOME 2 desktop environment which was used as Ubuntu’s default desktop until 10.10 (when it was replaced by Unity). The project began its life as an Ubuntu “remix”, but starting with version 15.04, it was formally accepted as an official member of the Ubuntu family of Linux distributions.

29. Nitrux (37)
Nitrux is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution suitable for laptops and desktop computers. Its main desktop environment is Nomad, a KDE Plasma desktop enhanced with “plasmoids” to create a special blend of aesthetics and functionality. The project also focuses on building redistributable applications using the AppImage format.

30. Q4OS (38)
Q4OS is a Debian-based desktop Linux distribution designed to offer classic-style user interface (Trinity) and simple accessories, and to serve stable APIs for complex third-party applications, such as Google Chrome, VirtualBox and development tools. The system is also very useful for virtual cloud environments due to its very low hardware requirements.

31. Xubuntu (39)
Xubuntu is a community-developed operating system based on Ubuntu. It comes with Xfce, which is a stable, light and configurable desktop environment.

32. TrueOS (40)
TrueOS has as its goals to be an easy-to-install-and-use desktop and server operating system, based on FreeBSD. To accomplish this, it provides a graphical installation to enable even UNIX novices to easily install and get it running. It pre-configures desktop environments, video, sound, and networking so that the desktop can be used immediately. A graphical software installation program makes installing pre-built software as easy as other popular operating systems.

33. Voyager Live (41)
Voyager Live is an Xubuntu-based distribution and live DVD showcasing the Xfce desktop environment. Its features include the Avant Window Navigator or AWN (a dock-like navigation bar), Conky (a program which displays useful information on the desktop), and over 300 photographs and animations that can be used as desktop backgrounds. The project also develops several other editions of Voyager Live – a “GE” edition with GNOME Shell, a “GS” variant for Gamers, and a separately-maintained flavour based on Debian’s “stable” branch.

34. Pop!_OS (42)
Pop!_OS is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution featuring a custom GNOME desktop. Pop!_OS is designed to have a minimal amount of clutter on the desktop without distractions in order to allow the user to focus on work. The distribution is developed by Linux computer retailer System76.

35. 4MLinux (43)
4MLinux is a miniature, 32-bit Linux distribution focusing on four capabilities: maintenance (as a system rescue live CD), multimedia (for playing video DVDs and other multimedia files), miniserver (using the inetd daemon), and mystery (providing several small Linux games). The distribution includes support for booting on UEFI-enabled machines.

36. Kubuntu (44)
Kubuntu is a free, user-friendly Linux distribution based on KDE’s desktop software and on the Ubuntu operating system. It has a biannual release cycle. Besides providing an up-to-date version of the KDE desktop at the time of the release, the project also releases updated KDE packages throughout the lifetime of each release.

37. GhostBSD (46)
GhostBSD is a user-friendly desktop operating system based on TrueOS (which is, in turn, based on FreeBSD’s development branch). The project’s goal is to create an easy-to-use and familiar workspace that can be used at home or office and for data rescue. GhostBSD supports a number of popular lightweight desktop environments, including MATE, Xfce. It also provides FreeBSD’s package management system, LibreOffice, LibreCAD, and Eclipse/Anjuta development environments for C, C++, Java, JavaScript, Jala and Python.

38. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (47)
Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is a Linux distribution developed by Red Hat and targeted toward the commercial market. Red Hat Enterprise Linux is released in server editions for x86, x86_64, Itanium, PowerPC and IBM System z architectures, and desktop editions for x86 and x86_64 processors. All of Red Hat’s official support and training and the Red Hat Certification Program centres around the Red Hat Enterprise Linux platform. Red Hat uses strict trademark rules to restrict free re-distribution of its officially supported versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, but still freely provides its source code. Third-party derivatives can be built and redistributed by stripping away non-free components.

39. Ultimate Edition (48)
Ultimate Edition, first released in December 2006, is a fork of Ubuntu and Linux Mint. The goal of the project is to create a complete, seamlessly integrated, visually stimulating, and easy-to-install operating system. Single-button upgrade is one of several special characteristics of this distribution. Other main features include custom desktop and theme with 3D effects, support for a wide range of networking options, including WiFi and Bluetooth, and integration of many extra applications and package repositories.

40. Bodhi Linux (49)
Bodhi Linux is an elegant and lightweight Ubuntu-based distribution featuring Moksha, an Enlightenment-17-based desktop environment. The project takes a decidedly minimalist approach by offering modularity, high levels of customisation, and choice of themes. In addition to basic 32- and 64-bit systems, Bodhi maintains designated ISO images for Chromebooks and legacy machines. By default Bodhi has only five pre-installed applications: Midori, Terminology, PCManFM, ePhoto, and ePad. Additional software is available via AppCenter, a web-based software installation tool.

41. Bluestar Linux (50)
Bluestar Linux is a GNU/Linux distribution that is based on Arch Linux. The Bluestar distribution features up to date packages, a full range of desktop and multimedia software in the default installation and a live desktop DVD.

42. Gentoo Linux (51)
Gentoo Linux is a versatile and fast, completely free Linux distribution geared towards developers and network professionals. Unlike other distros, Gentoo Linux has an advanced package management system called Portage. Portage is a true ports system in the tradition of BSD ports, but is Python-based and sports a number of advanced features including dependencies, fine-grained package management, “fake” (OpenBSD-style) installs, safe unmerging, system profiles, virtual packages, config file management, and more.

43. Void (52)
Void is an independently-developed, general-purpose operating system based on the monolithic Linux kernel. It features a hybrid binary/source package management system which allows users to quickly install, update and remove software, or to build software directly from sources with the help of the XBPS source packages collection. Other features of the distribution include support for Raspberry Pi single-board computers (both armv6 and armv7), rolling-release development model with daily updates, integration of OpenBSD’s LibreSSL software, and native init system called “runit”.

44. Android-x86 (54)
Android-x86 is an unofficial initiative to port Google’s Android mobile operating system to run on devices powered by Intel and AMD x86 processors, rather than RISC-based ARM chips. The project began as a series of patches to the Android source code to enable Android to run on various netbooks and ultra-mobile PCs, particularly the ASUS Eee PC.

45. Netrunner (55)
Netrunner is a Debian-based distribution featuring a highly customised KDE desktop with extra applications, multimedia codecs, Flash and Java plugins, and a unique look and feel. The modifications are designed to enhance the user-friendliness of the desktop environment while still preserving the freedom to tweak. A separate “Rolling” edition, based on Manjaro Linux, was launched in 2014, was discontinued and was re-launched in 2017.

46. Robolinux (56)
Robolinux is a user-friendly and intuitive operating system based on the latest long term support release of Ubuntu. One of the project’s more interesting features is the availability of a pre-configured virtual machine support pack with Windows XP or Windows 7 – a VirtualBox setup which allows the user to install and run the Windows operating system seamlessly alongside Robolinux. This is an optional add-on that must be downloaded from the project’s online store.

47. ArchLabs Linux (57)
ArchLabs is a distribution based on Arch Linux and featuring the Openbox window manager as the primary desktop interface. ArchLabs is a 64-bit, rolling release distribution which provides a live DVD. The distribution can be installed using the AL-Installer system installer.

48. Devuan GNU+Linux (58)
Devuan GNU+Linux is a Linux distribution forked from Debian in 2015. The project’s primary goal is to provide a variant of Debian without the complexities and dependencies of systemd, an init system and services manager originally developed by Red Hat and later adopted by most other Linux distributions. Devuan’s initial beta release was made available in April 2016, together with an upgrade path from Debian 7.0 “Wheezy” and a possibility to switch to Devuan from Debian 8.0 “Jessie”. The distribution adopted Xfce as its default desktop.

49. Feren OS (59)
Feren OS is a desktop Linux distribution based on Linux Mint’s main edition. It ships with the Cinnamon desktop environment and includes the WINE compatibility layer for running Windows applications. The distribution also ships with the WPS productivity software, which is mostly compatible with Microsoft Office, and the Vivaldi web browser.

50. Haiku (60)
Haiku is an open-source operating system, currently in development, that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the Be Operating System (BeOS), Haiku aims to become a fast, efficient, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful system for computer users of all levels. The key highlights that distinguish Haiku from other operating systems include: specific focus on personal computing, custom kernel designed for responsiveness, fully threaded design for great efficiency with multi-processor/core CPUs, rich object-oriented API for faster development, database-like file system (BFS) with support for indexed metadata, and unified, cohesive interface.

51. Omarine (61)
Omarine is a Linux-based operating system for servers. It can also be used for desktops with the GNOME or KDE Plasma option right at the login screen without any additional configuration. Omarine was originally based on Slackware Linux, but is now independently developed. It uses the RPM package management software.

52. KaOS (62)
KaOS is a desktop Linux distribution that features the latest version of the KDE desktop environment, the Calligra office suite, and other popular software applications that use the Qt toolkit. It was inspired by Arch Linux, but the developers build their own packages which are available from in-house repositories. KaOS employs a rolling-release development model and is built exclusively for 64-bit computer systems.

53. Qubes OS (63)
Qubes OS is a security-oriented, Fedora-based desktop Linux distribution whose main concept is “security by isolation” by using domains implemented as lightweight Xen virtual machines. It attempts to combine two contradictory goals: how to make the isolation between domains as strong as possible, mainly due to clever architecture that minimises the amount of trusted code, and how to make this isolation as seamless and easy as possible.

54. LXLE (64)
LXLE is an easy-to-use lightweight desktop Linux distribution based on Lubuntu and featuring the LXDE desktop environment. Compared to its parent, LXLE has a number of unique characteristics: it is built from Ubuntu’s LTS (long-term support) releases, it covers most users’ everyday needs by providing a good selection of default applications, and it adds useful modifications and tweaks to improve performance and functions.

55. ClearOS (65)
ClearOS is a small business server operating system with server, networking, and gateway functions. It is designed primarily for homes, small, medium, and distributed environments. It is managed from a web based user interface, but can also be completely managed and tuned from the command line. ClearOS is available in a free Community Edition, which includes available open source updates and patches from its upstream sources. ClearOS is also offered in a Home and Business Edition which receives additional testing of updates and only uses tested code for updates. Professional tech-support is also available. Currently ClearOS offers around 100+ different features which can be installed through the onboard ClearOS Marketplace.

56. Neptune (66)
Neptune is a GNU/Linux distribution for desktops. It is based on Debian’s Stable branch, except for a newer kernel, some drivers and newer versions of popular applications, such as LibreOffice. It also ships with the latest version of the KDE desktop. The distribution’s main goals are to provide a good-looking general-purpose desktop with pre-configured multimedia playback and to offer an easy-to-use USB installer with a persistence option.

57. SwagArch GNU/Linux (68)
SwagArch is a GNU/Linux desktop distribution based on Arch Linux. The SwagArch distribution features a live DVD that runs the Xfce desktop and uses the Calamares graphical system installer. SwagArch offers popular FOSS applications pre-installed, including Firefox and the VLC multimedia player.

58. Ubuntu Budgie (69)
Ubuntu Budgie (previously budgie-remix) is an Ubuntu-based distribution featuring the Budgie desktop, originally developed by the Solus project. Written from scratch and integrating tightly with GNOME stack, Budgie focuses on simplicity and elegance, while also offering useful features, such as the Raven notification and customisation centre.

59. DragonFly BSD (72)
DragonFly is an operating system and environment designed to be the logical continuation of the FreeBSD-4.x OS series. These operating systems belong in the same class as Linux in that they are based on UNIX ideals and APIs. DragonFly is a fork in the path, so to speak, giving the BSD base an opportunity to grow in an entirely new direction from the one taken in the FreeBSD-5 series.

60. Calculate Linux (74)
Calculate Linux is a Gentoo-based family of three distinguished distributions. Calculate Directory Server (CDS) is a solution that supports Windows and Linux clients via LDAP + SAMBA, providing proxy, mail and Jabbers servers with streamlined user management. Calculate Linux Desktop (CLD) is a workstation and client distribution with KDE, MATE or Xfce desktop that includes a wizard to configure a connection to Calculate Directory Server. Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS) is live CD with a build framework for creating a custom distribution.

61. BunsenLabs Linux (76)
BunsenLabs Linux is a distribution offering a light-weight and easily customizable Openbox desktop. The BunsenLabs distribution is based on Debian’s Stable branch and is a community continuation of the CrunchBang Linux distribution.

62. Ubuntu Studio (77)
Ubuntu Studio is a variant of Ubuntu aimed at the GNU/Linux audio, video and graphic enthusiast as well as professional. The distribution provides a collection of open-source applications available for multimedia creation.

63. NixOS (79)
NixOS is an independently developed GNU/Linux distribution that aims to improve the state of the art in system configuration management. In NixOS, the entire operating system, including the kernel, applications, system packages and configuration files, are built by the Nix package manager. Nix stores all packages in isolation from each other; as a result there are no /bin, /sbin, /lib or /usr directories and all packages are kept in /nix/store instead. Other innovative features of NixOS include reliable upgrades, rollbacks, reproducible system configurations, source-based model with binaries, and multi-user package management. Although NixOS started as a research project, it is now a functional and usable operating system that includes hardware detection, KDE as the default desktop, and systemd for managing system services.

64. MakuluLinux (80)
MakuluLinux is a Debian-based distribution providing a sleek, smooth and stable user experience on any computer. It includes pre-installed multimedia codecs, device drivers and software for everyday use.

65. MidnightBSD (82)
MidnightBSD is a FreeBSD-derived operating system. A critical goal of the project is to create an easy-to-use desktop environment with graphical ports management, and system configuration using GNUstep. The vast majority of the operating system will maintain a BSD license. MidnightBSD was forked from FreeBSD 6.1 beta.

66. Tiny Core Linux (83)
Tiny Core Linux is a 12 MB graphical Linux desktop. It is based on a recent Linux kernel, BusyBox, Tiny X, Fltk, and Flwm. The core runs entirely in memory and boots very quickly. The user has complete control over which applications and/or additional hardware to have supported, be it for a desktop, a nettop, an appliance or server; selectable from the project’s online repository.

67. Artix Linux (84)
Artix Linux is a fork (or continuation as an autonomous project) of the Arch-OpenRC and Manjaro-OpenRC projects. Artix Linux offers a lightweight, rolling-release operating system featuring the OpenRC init software. (An alternative spin features the runit init software.) Three editions of Artix are available, a minimal Base system, an edition featuring the i3 window manager and an edition which runs the LXQt desktop.

68. ExTiX (88)
ExTiX is a desktop Linux distribution and live DVD based on Ubuntu, offering a choice of alternative desktop environments.

69. Scientific Linux (90)
Scientific Linux is a recompiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux, co-developed by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Although it aims to be fully compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, it also provides additional packages not found in the upstream product; the most notable among these are various file systems, including Cluster Suite and Global File System (GFS), FUSE, OpenAFS, Squashfs and Unionfs, wireless networking support with Intel wireless firmware, MadWiFi and NDISwrapper, Sun Java and Java Development Kit (JDK), the lightweight IceWM window manager, R – a language and environment for statistical computing, and the Alpine email client.

70. OpenMandriva Lx (91)
The OpenMandriva distribution is a full-featured Linux desktop and server, sponsored by the OpenMandriva Association. It was based on ROSA, a Russian Linux distribution project which forked Mandriva Linux in 2012, incorporating many of Mandriva’s original tools and utilities and adding in-house enhancements. The goal of OpenMandriva is to facilitate the creation, improvement, promotion and distribution of free and open-source software in general, and OpenMandriva projects in particular.

71. ROSA (92)
ROSA is a Russian company developing a variety of Linux-based solutions. Its flagship product, ROSA Desktop, is a Linux distribution featuring a highly customised KDE desktop and a number of modifications designed to enhance the user-friendliness of the working environment. The company also develops an “Enterprise Server” edition of ROSA which is based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

72. AUSTRUMI (93)
AUSTRUMI (Austrum Latvijas Linukss) is a bootable live Linux distribution based on Slackware Linux. It requires limited system resources and can run on any Intel-compatible system with a CD-ROM installed. The entire operating system and all of the applications run from RAM, making AUSTRUMI a fast system and allowing the boot medium to be removed after the operating system starts.

73. ArchBang Linux (95)
ArchBang Linux is a lightweight distribution based on Arch Linux. Using the Openbox window manager, it is fast, up-to-date and suitable for both desktop and portable systems.

74. Sabayon (96)
Sabayon is a Gentoo-based distribution which follows the works-out-of-the-box philosophy, aiming to give the user a wide number of applications that are ready for use and a self-configured operating system. Sabayon offers the user an easy-to-use workspace with a captivating look, good hardware detection and a large number of up-to-date software packages installed by default, with additional software available from a repository. Sabayon is available in several flavors featuring respectively the KDE, GNOME and Xfce desktop environments.

75. Chakra GNU/Linux (97)
Chakra GNU/Linux is a user-friendly and powerful distribution and live CD originally forked from Arch Linux. It features a graphical installer, automatic hardware detection and configuration, the latest KDE desktop, and a variety of tools and extras.

76. Emmabuntüs (98)
Emmabuntüs is a desktop Linux distributionwith editions based on based on Xubuntu and Debian’s Stable branch. It strives to be beginner-friendly and reasonably light on resources so that it can be used on older computers. It also includes many modern features, such as large number of pre-configured programs for everyday use, dockbar for launching applications, easy installation of non-free software and media codecs, and quick setup through automated scripts. The distribution supports English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish languages.

77. Trisquel GNU/Linux (99)
Trisquel GNU/Linux is a 100% libre Ubuntu-based Linux distribution. Its main purpose is to provide an operating system for varied audience, including home and office users, educational institutions, multimedia workstations, etc. The project is managed by independent developers and is partially funded by donations.

78. VectorLinux (100)
VectorLinux is a small, fast, Intel based Linux operating system for PC style computers. The creators of VectorLinux had a single credo: keep it simple, keep it small and let the end user decide what their operating system is going to be. What has evolved from this concept is perhaps the best little Linux operating system available anywhere. For the casual computer user there is a lightening-fast desktop with graphical programs to handle daily activities from web surfing, sending and receiving email, chatting on IRC to running an FTP server. The power user will be pleased because all the tools are there to compile programs, use the system as a server or perhaps the gateway for home or office computer network. Administrators will be equally pleased because of the small size and memory requirements, so the operating system can be deployed on older machines that have long been forgotten.

79. Redcore Linux (101)
Redcore Linux explores the idea of bringing the power of Gentoo Linux to the masses. It aims to be a very quick way to install a pure Gentoo Linux system without spending hours or days compiling from source code, and reading documentation. To achieve this goal, Redcore provides a repository with pre-built binary packages which receives continuous updates, following a rolling release model.

80. NuTyX (102)
NuTyX is a French Linux distribution (with multi-language support) built from Linux From Scratch and Beyond Linux From Scratch, with a custom package manager called “cards”. The package manager can install individual binary packages, a group of related binary packages (e.g. desktop packages, such as KDE or Xfce), and compile source packages from “ports”. The distribution is designed for intermediate and advanced Linux users.

81. Fatdog64 Linux (106)
Fatdog64 Linux is a small, desktop, 64-bit Linux distribution. Originally created as a derivative of Puppy Linux with additional applications, Fatdog64 has grown to become an independent Linux distribution while still keeping the style of Puppy Linux.

82. Pinguy OS (108)
Pinguy OS is an Ubuntu-based distribution targeted at beginning Linux users. It features numerous user-friendly enhancements, out-of-the-box support for multimedia codecs and browser plugins, a heavily tweaked GNOME user interface with enhanced menus, panels and dockbars, and a careful selection of popular desktop applications for many common computing tasks.

83. Whonix (109)
Whonix is an operating system focused on anonymity, privacy and security. It is based on the Tor anonymity network, Debian GNU/Linux and security by isolation. Whonix consists of two parts: One solely runs Tor and acts as a gateway, which is called Whonix-Gateway. The other, which is called Whonix-Workstation, is on a completely isolated network. Only connections through Tor are possible. With Whonix, you can use applications and run servers anonymously over the Internet. DNS leaks are impossible, and even malware with root privileges cannot find out the user’s real IP.

84. Parabola GNU/Linux-libre (110)
Parabola GNU/Linux-libre is an unofficial “libre” variant of Arch Linux. It aims to provide a fully free (as in freedom) distribution based on the packages of the Arch Linux project, with packages optimised for i686 and x86_64 processors. The goal is to give the users complete control over their systems with 100% “libre” software. Parabola GNU/Linux-libre is listed by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) as a fully free software distribution. Besides a standard installation CD image, the project also provides a live/rescue DVD image with MATE as the default desktop environment.

85. PureOS (111)
PureOS is a GNU/Linux live CDs based on Debian’s Testing repository. It is a desktop distribution that can be used as live media (CD or USB) or as full-featured operating systems installed on a hard disk. PureOS uses free and open source software exclusively and is endorsed by the Free Software Foundation.

86. AV Linux (112)
AV Linux is a versatile, Debian-based distribution featuring a large collection of audio and video production software. Additionally, it also includes a custom kernel with IRQ threading enabled for low-latency audio performance. AV Linux can be run directly from a live DVD or a live USB storage device, though it can also be installed on a hard disk and used as a general-purpose operating system for everyday tasks.

87. Funtoo Linux (113)
Funtoo Linux is a Gentoo-based distribution developed by Daniel Robbins (the founder and former project leader of Gentoo Linux) and a core team of developers, built around a basic vision of improving the core technologies in Gentoo Linux. Funtoo Linux features native UTF-8 support enabled by default, a git-based, distributed Portage tree and Funtoo overlay, an enhanced Portage with more compact mini-manifest tree, automated imports of new Gentoo changes every 12 hours, GPT/GUID boot support and streamlined boot configuration, enhanced network configuration, up-to-date stable and current Funtoo stages – all built using Funtoo’s Metro build tool.

88. Septor (114)
Septor is a Linux distribution which provides users with a pre-configured computing environment for surfing the Internet anonymously. It is based on Debian’s “Testing” branch and it uses Privoxy, a privacy-enhancing proxy, together with the Tor anonymity network to modify web page data and HTTP headers before the page is rendered by the browser. The distribution uses KDE Plasma as the preferred desktop environment and it also includes a launcher for downloading the latest Tor Browser, OnionShare for anonymous file sharing, and Ricochet for anonymous instant messaging.

89. GeckoLinux (117)
GeckoLinux is a Linux spin based on the openSUSE distribution, with a focus on polish and out-of-the-box usability on the desktop. The distribution features many desktop editions which can be installed from live discs. Some patent encumbered open source software is included in GeckoLinux which is not available in the default installation of openSUSE. Special attention has been given to the quality of the font rendering. GeckoLinux provides two main editions, Static (which is based on openSUSE Leap) and Rolling (based on openSUSE Tumbleweed).

90. blackPanther OS (119)
blackPanther OS is a Hungarian Linux distribution which borrows features from other major projects, including Mandriva Linux (graphical configuration tools), Fedora (graphical user interface) and Ubuntu (driver management). The distribution is designed for use at school, home and work as it contains applications for common daily tasks, such as time management, office work or media playback.

91. Refracta (120)
Refracta is a Linux distribution based on Devuan GNU+Linux (a systemd-free fork of Debian), designed primarily for home computer users and also for use as a system rescue and recovery disk. It provides a simple and familiar layout using the Xfce desktop. Other desktop environments and additional software packages are available from the Devuan package repository. Besides providing a Linux distribution on a live CD, the project also develops useful tools, such as refractainstaller, refractasnapshot and refracta2usb which allow users to customize the installation and create custom live CD or live USB images.

92. SolydXK (121)
SolydX and SolydK are Debian-based distributions with the Xfce and KDE desktops respectively. SolydXK aims to be simple to use, providing an environment that is both stable and secure. SolydXK is an open-source alternative for small businesses, non-profit organisations and home users. The project started as an unofficial variant of Linux Mint’s “Debian” edition with KDE as the default desktop, but it was later given its own identity as SolydK. SolydX was added after Linux Mint dropped its Debian-based flavour that used the Xfce desktop.

93. OpenIndiana (122)
OpenIndiana is a continuation of the OpenSolaris operating system. It was conceived during the period of uncertainty following the Oracle takeover of Sun Microsystems, after several months passed with no binary updates made available to the public. The formation proved timely, as Oracle discontinued OpenSolaris soon after in favour of Solaris 11 Express, a binary distribution with a more closed development model to début later this year. OpenIndiana is part of the Illumos Foundation, and provides a true open-source community alternative to Solaris 11 and Solaris 11 Express, with an open development model and full community participation.

94. ALT Linux (123)
ALT Linux was founded in 2001 by a merge of two large Russian free software projects. By the year 2008 it became a large organization developing and deploying free software, writing documentation and technical literature, supporting users, and developing custom products. ALT Linux produces different types of distributions for various purposes. There are desktop distributions for home and office computers and for corporate servers, universal distributions that include a wide variety of development tools and documentation, certified products, distributions specialized for educational institutions, and distributions for low-powered computers. ALT Linux has its own development infrastructure and repository called Sisyphus, which provides the base for all the different editions of ALT Linux.

95. siduction (125)
The siduction distribution is a desktop-oriented operating system and live medium based on the “unstable” branch of Debian GNU/Linux. Forked from aptosid in late 2011, siduction offers many separate live media with a range of desktop environments. The project also promises regular releases, an open development model, and friendly relationship with its developer and user community.

96. SUSE Linux Enterprise (128)
SUSE Linux Enterprise is an interoperable platform for mission-critical computing.  SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop is an enterprise-quality Linux desktop that’s ready for routine business use.  It provides interoperability with existing systems and many office applications.  It also delivers flexibility for desktop and notebook clients, thin-client devices, and high-end technical workstations.  SUSE Linux Enterprise Server is designed to handle mission-critical workloads. It is an open, scalable, solution that comes with integrated Xen-based virtualization, application security, and systems management across a range of hardware architectures.  SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides interoperability with Windows and other platforms, and it provides a secure foundation for a broad range of edge, departmental and data center needs.

97. Absolute Linux (129)
Absolute Linux is a light-weight modification of Slackware Linux. It includes several utilities that make configuration and maintenance easier and it has many common desktop and Internet applications installed and configured with tight integration of menus, applications and MIME types. Absolute Linux uses IceWM and ROX for its window and file managers.

98. Pardus (134)
Pardus is a GNU/Linux distribution jointly developed by the Scientific & Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBİTAK) and National Academic Network and Information Centre (ULAKBİM). It started its life as a Gentoo-based project before developing its own unique identity. Since late 2012 the distribution, developed in two separate branches as “Corporate” and “Community” editions, is based on Debian. This page focuses on the Corporate version of Pardus.

99. Project Trident (135)
Project Trident is a desktop-focused operating system based on TrueOS, which in turn is based on FreeBSD. It uses the Lumina desktop as well as a number of self-developed system administration utilities.

100. Hyperbola GNU/Linux-libre (136)
The Hyperbola Project is a community driven effort to provide a fully free (as in freedom) operating system that is stable, secure, simple, lightweight that tries to Keep It Simple Stupid (KISS) with Long Term Support (LTS). Derived from Arch snapshots, plus stability and security from Debian, Hyperbola provides packages that meet the GNU Free System Distribution Guidelines (GNU FSDG) and offers replacements for the packages that do not meet this requirement. Packages are provided for the i686 and x86_64 architectures.

101. NetBSD (140)
NetBSD is a free, secure, and highly portable UNIX-like Open Source operating system available for many platforms, from 64-bit AlphaServers and desktop systems to handheld and embedded devices. Its clean design and advanced features make it excellent in both production and research environments, and it is user-supported with complete source. Many applications are easily available through The NetBSD Packages Collection.

102. SliTaz GNU/Linux (141)
SliTaz GNU/Linux is a mini distribution and live CD designed to run speedily on hardware with 256 MB of RAM. SliTaz uses BusyBox, a recent Linux kernel and GNU software. It boots with Syslinux and provides more than 200 Linux commands, the lighttpd web server, SQLite database, rescue tools, IRC client, SSH client and server powered by Dropbear, X window system, JWM (Joe’s Window Manager), gFTP, Geany IDE, Mozilla Firefox, AlsaPlayer, GParted, a sound file editor and more. The SliTaz ISO image fits on a less than 30 MB media and takes just 80 MB of hard disk space.

103. Zenwalk Linux (142)
Zenwalk Linux (formerly Minislack) is a Slackware-based GNU/Linux operating system with a goal of being slim and fast by using only one application per task and with focus on graphical desktop and multimedia usage. Zenwalk features the latest Linux technology along with a complete programming environment and libraries to provide an ideal platform for application programmers. Zenwalk’s modular approach also provides a simple way to convert Zenwalk Linux into a finely-tuned modern server (e.g. LAMP, messaging, file sharing).

104. Star (146)
Star is a desktop-oriented Linux distribution based on Devuan GNU/Linux. Star is available in a range of editions, each featuring a lightweight desktop environment. Star is small enough to fit on a CD and uses SysV init software.

105. Peach OSI (147)
Peach OSI is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution featuring the Xfce desktop customised to resemble Apple’s OS X user interface. The releases follow Ubuntu’s long-term support (LTS) branches. Besides a standard desktop edition, the project also provides more specialist releases for netbooks, Raspberry Pi single-board computers, home theatre systems, as well as a customised build designed for children.

106. LinuxConsole (150)
LinuxConsole is an independently developed Linux live CD with different editions designed for desktops, servers, gaming consoles, and old computers. Its primary characteristics are easy installation, extensive choice of software in the form of modules, and excellent hardware detection.

107. Runtu (151)
Runtu is a Russian desktop Linux distribution based on Ubuntu’s LTS (long-term support) releases. It features full support for Russian and a variety of extra applications, tools and media codecs. There are two separate editions that are produced with a varying degree of frequency; the “Xfce” edition tend to get more attention while the “Lite” edition, featuring the LXDE desktop, is also released and updated from time to time.

108. Slackel (152)
Slackel is a Linux distribution and live CD based on Slackware Linux and Salix OS. It is fully compatible with both. It uses the current version of Slackware and the latest version of the KDE desktop. The Slackel disc images are offered in two different forms – installation and live.

109. KolibriOS (153)
KolibriOS is a tiny open-source operating system with a monolithic preemptive kernel and video drivers for 32-bit x86 architecture computers. KolibriOS is a fork of MenuetOS, written entirely in FASM (assembly language). However, C, C++, Free Pascal, Forth, among other high-level languages and compilers, can also be used in application development. KolibriOS features a rich set of applications that include a word processor, image viewer, graphical editor, web browser, and over 30 games.

110. Linspire (154)
Linspire is a full-featured operating system (based on Debian GNU/Linux and Ubuntu) like Microsoft Windows XP or Apple Mac OS X. Linspire offers the power, stability and cost-savings of Linux with the ease of a Windows environment. In addition, Linspire features exclusive Click-N-Run (CNR) technology that makes installing software on Linspire fast and easy. Note: Linspire was acquired by Xandros Inc. in July 2008 and discontinued as a Linux distribution shortly afterwards. Linspire was later purchased by PC/OpenSystems in 2017 and sold as an Ubuntu-based commercial distribution.

111. SharkLinux (157)
SharkLinux is an Ubuntu-based distribution featuring the MATE desktop. The distribution automatically upgrades packages on the system to apply security patches. The distribution also enables sudo access by default without requiring a password for user convenience. SharkLinux features the Ubuntu Hardware Enablement (HWE) kernel by default.

112. Linuxfx (162)
Linuxfx is a Brazilian Ubuntu-based distribution. It features an intuitive KDE desktop user interface, automatic hardware detection and configuration, support for popular multimedia codecs, and a collection of useful software for office use and media playback. Linuxfx supports Portuguese, Spanish and English languages.

113. PrimTux (163)
PrimTux is a Debian-based distribution developed by a small team of school teachers and computer enthusiasts in the educational environment. It is not intended to replace or become the main operating system of a modern computer, but an upgrade for obsolete equipment and benefiting the school or educational environment in the spirit of education.

114. Exe GNU/Linux (164)
Exe GNU/Linux is a Debian-based desktop Linux distribution. Its primary goal is to provide a Debian variant that ships with a slightly re-themed Trinity desktop environment (a fork of KDE 3), as well as several useful scripts and utilities. It offers LXDE as an alternative desktop. It uses the official Debian repositories, as well as the Trinity mirror for updating the desktop environment. In late 2017, the distribution re-based itself on Devuan, using the official Devuan repositories.

115. Obarun (165)
Obarun is an Arch Linux based distribution featuring the S6 init software in place of systemd. Obarun provides a live disc featuring the JWM graphical interface. Utilities, such as pacopts, are included for working with Arch’s repositories, including the Arch User Repository (AUR).

116. Cucumber Linux (168)
Cucumber Linux aims to provide a Linux distribution that is usable as an every day, general purpose operating system. It aims to this in as minimalistic a way as possible and in a way that follows the Unix Philosophy. Cucumber Linux favors simplicity and modularity of design over simplicity of use. While developed independently, Cucumber’s design is heavily influenced by Slackware Linux.

117. Salix (169)
Salix is a Slackware-based Linux distribution that is simple, fast, easy to use and compatible with Slackware Linux. Optimised for desktop use, Salix OS features one application per task, custom package repositories, advanced package management with dependency support, localised system administration tools and innovative artwork.

118. Ubuntu DesktopPack (171)
Ubuntu DesktopPack is an Ubuntu remix built by Ukraine’s UALinux, an official partner of Canonical. It comes with extra applications, drivers and media codecs, and includes full support for English, Russian and Ukrainian languages. Besides the default Ubuntu build, the project also releases variants based on Kubuntu and Xubuntu, as well as a free extension CD for schools and commercial CD/DVD packs with extra software for desktops, servers and gaming stations.

119. Pisi Linux (173)
Pisi Linux is a GNU/Linux distribution based on the old Pardus Linux with its famous PiSi package management system. It’s an operating system for desktop computer with software for listening to music, browsing the Internet and creating documents. Pisi Linux is built from scratch on a stable base, but many core user applications, such as the Firefox web browser or the VLC media player, are kept constantly up to date. To increase the distribution’s user friendliness, Flash player and many multimedia codecs are installed and pre-configured for immediate use.

120. Greenie Linux (175)
Greenie Linux is a Slovak desktop distribution based on Ubuntu and optimised for users in Slovakia and the Czech Republic. Created as an operating system designed for every-day use and focusing on the needs of book readers and writers, Greenie Linux combines a set of applications for home use, out-of-the-box functionality and Ubuntu repositories. It also includes a set of tools for reading, writing and modifying books and documents. The goal of the distribution is to create a user-friendly desktop system and a useful live CD.

121. Legacy OS (181)
Legacy OS (formerly TEENpup Linux) is a distribution based on Puppy Linux. Although the original concept was to create a flavour of Puppy Linux with more applications and a more appealing desktop aimed at teenage users, Legacy OS has now grown to become a general purpose distribution. It comes with a large number of applications, browser plugins and media codecs as standard software. Each new release of Legacy OS is about refining an operating system based on a system core from 2007, meaning core packages such as the Linux kernel, are a decade old. Legacy OS is intended to be installed on older computers, such as Pentium 3/4 machines.

122. ToriOS (182)
ToriOS is a Debian-based distribution which is designed to work on older computers, even 32-bit machines which do not support running PAE-enabled kernels. ToriOS strives to maintain the KISS principle and uses JWM to provide a lightweight graphical user interface.

123. CRUX (184)
CRUX is a lightweight, Linux distribution for computers running on 64-bit x86 and ARM processors. The distribution is targeted at experienced Linux users. The primary focus of this distribution is “keep it simple”, which is reflected in a simple tar.gz-based package system, BSD-style initscripts, and a relatively small collection of trimmed packages. The secondary focus is utilization of new Linux features and recent tools and libraries.

124. Namib GNU/Linux (193)
Namib GNU/Linux is a desktop operating system based on (and compatible with) the Arch Linux distribution. Namib is available in multiple desktop editions and can be set up using the Calamares system installer.

125. Pearl Linux OS (196)
Pearl Linux OS is a distribution based on Ubuntu. Pearl uses components of the LXDE and Xfce desktop environments to create a desktop experience which looks similar to Apple’s OS X desktop environment. The project calls this hybrid desktop PearlDE. Pearl Linux OS is available in several editions, including GNOME, MATE and PearlDE.

126. Subgraph OS (197)
Subgraph OS is a Debian-based Linux distribution which provides several security, anonymous web browsing and hardening features. Subgraph OS uses a hardened Linux kernel, application firewall to block specific executables from accessing the network and forces all Internet traffic through the Tor network. The distribution’s file manager features tools to remove meta-data from files and integrates with the OnionShare file sharing application. The Icedove e-mail client is set up to automatically work with Enigmail for encrypting e-mails.

127. AryaLinux (201)
AryaLinux is a source-based GNU/Linux distribution that has been put together using Linux From Scratch (LFS) as a guide. The AryaLinux distribution uses a source/ports style of package management and a custom package manager called alps.

128. Maui Linux (202)
Maui Linux is a desktop Linux distribution based on KDE neon and featuring KDE’s Plasma desktop. It was created in August 2016 as a continuation of Netrunner’s Kubuntu-based “Desktop” edition, but it was re-based on KDE neon which is a more cutting-edge project with frequent updates and a semi-rolling release model. Besides providing a KDE-centric distribution with many popular KDE packages included on the live DVD, the project also focuses on integrating non-KDE software, such as Firefox, Thunderbird or VLC with the underlying infrastructure of the Plasma desktop.

129. Toutou Linux (203)
Toutou Linux is an open-source Linux operating system based on the tiny, yet powerful and popular Puppy Linux distribution, specially designed to be compatible with old hardware. The system uses the lightweight Openbox as its default window manager and LXPanel as its main taskbar. It features various customisation options. Toutou Linux uses OCI, a custom-built application that automates the installation, a first-boot assistant for configuring several aspects of the desktop, and Opera as the default web browser. Toutou Linux is distributed as a single live CD image supporting the 32-bit architecture only. Its default language is French, but other languages can be added.

130. BigLinux (204)
BigLinux is a Brazilian Linux distribution localised into Brazilian Portuguese. It is was originally based on Kubuntu, but starting from 2017 the distribution has been re-born based on deepin. It offers two desktop environments – Cinnamon and Deepin.

131. KXStudio (206)
KXStudio is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution with a collection of applications and plugins for professional audio production. Besides developing a complete operating system on a live DVD, the project also provides a custom set of audio applications and utilities (such as a full-featured audio plugin host and a JACK patch bay), a wide range of open-source audio plugins and Linux ports, and software repositories compatible with the Debian GNU/Linux and Ubuntu distributions.

132. BeeFree OS (210)
BeeFree OS is a Linux distribution based on Linux Mint. BeeFree OS features the Cinnamon desktop environment, a Unity theme and an application menu which resembles the Windows 7 Start menu. BeeFree OS features the BeeBEEP secure LAN instant messaging software and the ability to install portable, off-line applications from the CenterFree.cf store.

133. KANOTIX (212)
KANOTIX is a Linux distribution based on the latest stable release of Debian GNU/Linux. It is built on top of a latest kernel which is carefully patched with fixes and drivers for most modern hardware. Although it can be used as a live CD, it also includes a graphical installer for hard disk installation. The user-friendly nature of the distribution is further enhanced by a custom-built control centre and specialist scripts.

134. SalentOS (213)
SalentOS is a Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution that uses Openbox as window manager. SalentOS has been designed to embrace lightness (hence the choice of Openbox), but at the same time it maintains the completeness and features of Debian. The system includes elements of GNOME and Xfce desktops.

135. Debian Edu/Skolelinux (216)
Debian Edu/Skolelinux is the Debian-edu project’s Custom Debian Distribution (CDD) in development. It is aiming to provide an out-of-the-box localised environment tailored for schools and universities. The out-of-the-box environment comes with 75 applications aimed at schools, as well as 15 network services pre-configured for a school environment. The simple, three-question installation requires minimal technical knowledge. Skolelinux is Debian, which means, among other things, that there are no license costs or worries, and that upgrade and maintenance of the software can be done over the Internet with the power of Debian’s apt-get. The core goals of Skolelinux are localisation and ease of system administration.

136. XStreamOS (221)
XStreamOS and XStream Desktop are Sonicle’s effort to maintain a distribution of the illumos kernel (originally derived from OpenSolaris), featuring the ZFS file system, Crossbow network architecture, virtualisation and zones, as well as a customised LXDE desktop. It also strives to develop and contribute to the illumos kernel. Sonicle, a company located in Italy, also maintains two other full-featured products – XStream Server and XStream Storage.

137. Hamara (222)
Hamara is a Debian-based desktop distribution featuring the MATE desktop. Hamara is developed in India and the team works to provide improved translations for the more popular spoken languages in India. Downloading and using Hamara can be done free of charge though the company behind Hamara also provides commercial technical support.

138. CloudReady (226)
CloudReady is an operating system built and maintained by Neverware. Based on Google’s open source Chromium OS, CloudReady uses web apps and cloud storage instead of traditional software and local storage. The CloudReady distribution is available in free and commercially supported versions.

139. Exherbo (227)
Exherbo is a source-based Linux distribution inspired by the flexibility found in Gentoo Linux (among others). Designed primarily for developers and advanced users who are expected to take an active role in the development of the distribution, Exherbo offers a decentralised development model, original code, and a fast and flexible package manager called Paludis.

140. Freespire (228)
Freespire was once a community-run Linux distribution sponsored by Linspire. Freespire was discontinued in 2008. Starting in 2017 Freespire became a free operating system based on Ubuntu and run by PC/OpenSystems LLC. Freespire features the Xfce desktop environment.

141. RebeccaBlackOS (230)
RebeccaBlackOS is a Debian-based live distribution which can be used to run Wayland desktop sessions. RebeccaBlackOS can run a number of popular open source desktop environments on top of a Wayland graphical session. The distribution was (and remains) one of the only Linux distributions to run a Wayland session from live media. The distribution is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds for the x86 architecture.

142. GoboLinux (234)
GoboLinux is a modular Linux distribution – it organizes the programs in a new, logical way. Instead of having parts of a program thrown at /usr/bin, other parts at /etc and yet more parts thrown at /usr/share/something/or/another, each program gets its own directory tree, keeping them all neatly separated and allowing the user to see everything that’s installed in the system and which files belong to which programs in a simple and obvious way.

143. LuninuX OS (235)
LuninuX OS is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution designed to be beautiful, clean, simple, fast, and stable.

144. Stella (236)
Stella is a CentOS-based Linux distribution with focus on user-friendly desktop computing with GNOME 2 and out-of-the-box support for many popular multimedia formats. Besides standard upstream software, the project also maintains its own repository containing LibreOffice and a variety of useful desktop applications.

145. Vine Linux (237)
Vine Linux is a supreme Linux distribution with integrated Japanese environment for desktop PCs and notebooks. Project Vine was founded by six members of the Project Japanese Extension (JPE) in 1998 and has been developing Vine Linux with help of many members and volunteers. Vine Seed, the development version of Vine Linux, is a public software repository, which all developers are welcome to join and contribute to. Out-of-the-box Kanji support is available throughout most applications and Japanese input support is provided by either the FreeWnn (or Wnn6 in the commercial “CR” edition) or the Canna input server.

146. BlankOn (240)
BlankOn is an Debian-based distribution developed by the Indonesian Linux Mover Foundation and BlankOn developer team. It is an Indonesian distribution that includes a variety of software that is widely used by consumers in general, such as office programs, financial applications, Internet applications, drawing (both vector and bitmap), support for various multimedia file formats, as well as other interesting programs.

147. DuZeru (242)
DuZeru is a Brazilian Linux distribution that is based on Debian’s Stable branch. DuZeru ships with the Xfce desktop environment and is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit x86 builds.

148. Enso OS (244)
Enso OS is a Linux distribution based on Xubuntu. Enso features the Xfce desktop with Gala, imported from elementary OS, as the default window manager. The distribution also features the Panther application launcher and the Plank dock.

149. Source Mage GNU/Linux (245)
Sourcemage is a source-based GNU/Linux distribution based on a Sorcery metaphor of ‘casting’ and ‘dispelling’ programs, which we refer to as ‘spells’.

150. T2 SDE (246)
T2 is an open source system development environment (or distribution build kit if you are more familiar with that term). T2 allows the creation of custom distributions with bleeding edge technology. Currently, the Linux kernel is normally used – but we are expanding to Hurd, OpenDarwin and OpenBSD; more to come. T2 started as a community driven fork from the ROCK Linux Project with the aim to create a decentralised development and a clean framework for spin-off projects and customised distributions.

151. Plop Linux (250)
Plop Linux is a small distribution that can boot from CD, DVD, USB flash drive (UFD), USB hard disk or from network with PXE. It is designed to rescue data from a damaged system, backup and restore operating systems, automate tasks and more.

152. Rebellin Linux (251)
Rebellin Linux is a beginner-friendly desktop Linux distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux. The project offers two separate editions – “Synergy” which is based on Debian’s latest stable version and “Adrenalin” which is derived from Debian’s unstable branch. Both editions provide a highly customised GNOME 3 desktop user interface. Starting with version 2.5, a MATE desktop environment option has also become available.

153. LliureX (255)
LliureX is a project of the Council of Culture, Education and Sport at the Municipality of Valencia, Spain. The LliureX distribution is an Edubuntu-based live and installation DVD with support for the Valencian and Spanish languages. It is intended as an operating system for educational institutions in the Valencia region. LliureX uses exclusively free software and is distributed free of charge.

154. Plamo Linux (256)
Plamo Linux is a Japanese Linux distribution based on Slackware Linux. The installer, and many text-based and graphical tools have been updated to include Japanese language support.

155. Canaima GNU/Linux (259)
Canaima GNU/Linux is a Venezuelan desktop distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux. It is primarily designed as a solution for the computers of National Public Administration in accordance with the presidential decree number 3.390 about the use of free technologies in National Public Administration in the country.

156. Liquid Lemur Linux (260)
Liquid Lemur Linux is a desktop Linux distribution that was based on Ubuntu and Linux Mint, with modern versions being built on Debian. It delivers a “hybrid” desktop experience, combining the Window Maker window manager with elements of the Xfce desktop environments. Its other features include a utility for install various desktop enhancements and add-ons, a Conky system monitoring tool to select predefined Conky scripts, and a custom live system installer.

157. MAX: Madrid_Linux (261)
Madrid_Linux, or MAX for short, is an GNU/Linux distribution created by the Council of Education of Madrid, Spain. It is a live operating system based on Ubuntu. Besides the ability to boot the operating system on any computer, the distribution includes a graphical installer with an option to resize FAT or NTFS partition and create space for installing MAX on a hard disk.

158. Springdale Linux (263)
Springdale Linux (formerly PUIAS Linux) is a complete operating system for desktops and servers, built by compiling the source packages for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Besides these upstream packages, the project also provides several other repositories: “Addons” which contains additional packages not included in a stock Red Hat distribution, “Computational” which carries software specific to scientific computing, and “Unsupported” which holds various experimental packages. The distribution is maintained by the Institute for Advanced Study and Princeton University in the USA.

159. UTUTO (265)
UTUTO GNU/Linux is an Ubuntu-based distribution (Gentoo-based before version 2017) developed by at the Universidad Nacional de Salta in Argentina. Named after a fidgety local lizard that pokes its nose into every hole, UTUTO is a high-performance desktop system designed to be used by home and office users, developers, organisations and government officials.

160. Window Maker Live (267)
Window Maker Live is a Debian-based Linux distribution that applies the Window Maker window manager as the default graphical user interface and integrates well-known open-source components in an attractive and usable user interface. The distribution includes integrated GNOME components, as well as the Firefox web browser and the Thunderbird mail client both of which are enhanced with essential productivity add-ons.

161. Swift Linux (272)
Swift Linux is a lightweight, MX Linux-based distribution featuring the Xfce desktop environment. While Swift previously included forensic analysis and data recovery utilities, since version 16 the distribution has presented itself as MX Linux with alternative wallpaper.

162. PLD Linux Distribution (278)
PLD Linux Distribution is a free, RPM-based Linux distribution, aimed at the more advanced users and administrators, who accept the trade-offs of using a system that might require manual tweaking in exchange for flexibility. Simultaneous support for a wide variety of architectures and non-conservative approach to RPM usage provide the users with a consistent environment on almost all available architectures.

163. Pardus Topluluk (279)
Pardus is a GNU/Linux distribution jointly developed by the Scientific & Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBİTAK) and National Academic Network and Information Centre (ULAKBİM). It started its life as a Gentoo-based project before developing its own unique identity. Since late 2012 the distribution, developed in two separate branches as “Corporate” and “Community” editions, is based on Debian. This is the page for the Community edition.

164. UHU-Linux (282)
UHU-Linux is the leading distribution of Linux in Hungary. It is primarily intended for Hungarian users, thus special care is taken to support the Hungarian language as much as possible. Ease of installation and sane default settings both help new users of Linux and make veterans feel comfortable. Usability as the main goal involves having all the cutting-edge yet stable releases of Open Source packages, with dpkg as the package manager. Development is completely open and everyone is invited to join.

165. Uruk GNU/Linux (283)
Uruk GNU/Linux is a free software desktop distribution based on Trisquel. It follows the licensing guidelines of the Free Software Foundation. Uruk primarily uses .deb package files, but strives to support a wide range of package formats, including .rpm files.

166. Kwort Linux (285)
Kwort is a CRUX-based Linux distribution that uses the GTK+ toolkit and the Openbox window manager. Its most prominent feature is a package manager, called kpkg, for retrieving packages from download mirrors.

167. ToOpPy Linux (287)
ToOpPy Linux is a French distribution based on Puppy Linux. The project provides a lightweight distribution which includes many small utilities and can be run either from a live disc or installed on the hard drive.

168. VenenuX (288)
VenenuX is a South American desktop distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux and intended primarily for Spanish-speaking users. It adheres strictly to the principles of free software as defined by the Free Software Foundation.

169. ARMA aka Omoikane GNU/Linux (291)
Omoikane GNU/Linux, known as OGL, is a Japanese distribution based on Debian’s testing branch. It has a user friendly installer based on Scheme and GTK+. The commercial branch of the Omoikane GNU/Linux is knows as ARMA – it includes the most popular Japanese input method “ATOK”, RICHO True Type Fonts and other features. A free version of OGL, containing fewer packages, is available from FTP servers and mirrors.

170. tuxtrans (296)
The tuxtrans distribution is a specialist, Xubuntu-based Linux distribution developed for translators. It features the MATE desktop environment and it also includes a broad collection of software applications which allow translators to do their jobs. It comes with many applications suited to the everyday tasks of a translator or anybody dealing with multilingual texts. The included software ranges from an office suite and DTP software to specialised translation memory systems.

171. BOSS GNU/Linux (300)
BOSS (Bharat Operating System Solutions) GNU/Linux is a Debian-based Linux distribution developed by C-DAC for enhancing the use of free and open source software in India. Made specifically for the Indian environment, it consists of a pleasing desktop environment coupled with support for several Indian languages (Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Malayalam, Punjabi, Tamil) and other packages that are most relevant for use in the government domain.

172. Nova (301)
Nova is a user-friendly, desktop-oriented Linux distribution developed by the University of Computer Sciences in Havana, Cuba. In the product’s early days the operating system was based on Gentoo Linux and Sabayon Linux, but starting from version 2.1 the developers have chosen Ubuntu as the base system. The project releases three separate editions – “Escritorio” (with GNOME Shell), “Ligero” (with a Nova-developed lightweight desktop called “Guano”) and “Servidor” (a variant for servers).

173. Condres OS (303)
Condres OS is a rolling release distribution based on Arch Linux. The distribution is available in nine editions (most of them for various desktop environments) and ships with convenience features such as desktop icons enabled (on GNOME), the ICE site specific browser, and the TLP power management software.

174. Poseidon Linux (304)
Poseidon Linux is a GNU/Linux distribution designed primarily for academic and scientific use. It is based on Ubuntu LTS, enhancing its parent by adding a large number of applications for GIS/maps, numerical modelling, 2D/3D/4D visualisation, statistics, genetics, creating simple and complex graphics, and programming languages. The usual software for daily use, such as the LibreOffice suite, Internet browsers, instant messaging and chat clients are also included.

175. EasyOS (305)
EasyOS is an experimental Linux distribution which uses many of the technologies and package formats pioneered by Puppy Linux. The distribution features custom container technology called Easy Containers which can run applications or the entire desktop environment in a container. Packages, desktop settings, networking and sharing resources over the network can all be controlled through graphical utilities.

176. Endless OS (Not ranked)
Endless OS is a Linux-based operating system which provides a simplified and streamlined user experience using a customized desktop environment forked from GNOME 3. Rather than using a traditional Linux package management system, Endless OS uses a read-only root file system managed by OSTree with application bundles overlaid on top.

Search by Distribution Criteria (Advanced Search Form)
The advanced search form allows you to fine tune your search criteria by including multiple items in your search. Once completed, it will also allow you to display the result either as a list of all matching distributions with their descriptions, or in a sorted tabular format.

Operating System Type
All
BSD
Linux Solaris Other OS
Distribution category
All
Beginners
Clusters
Data Rescue
Desktop
Disk Management
Docker
Education
Firewall
Forensics
Free Software
From RAM
Gaming
High Performance Computing
Live Medium
Mobile
Multimedia
MythTV
NAS
Netbooks
Old Computers
Privacy
Raspberry Pi
Scientific
Server
Security
Source-based
Specialist
Telephony
Thin Client
Country of origin
All
Algeria
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Bhutan
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Brazil
Bulgaria
Cambodia
Canada
Chile
China
Cuba
Czech Republic
Denmark
Ecuador
Egypt
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Guatemala
Hong Kong
Hungary
India
Indonesia
Iran
Ireland
Isle of Man
Israel
Italy
Japan
Jordan
Latvia
Lithuania
Malaysia
Malta
Mexico
Mongolia
Nepal
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nigeria
Norway
Oman
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Puerto Rico
Réunion
Romania
Russia
Serbia
Singapore
Slovakia
Slovenia
South Africa
South Korea
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sweden
Switzerland
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
USA
Venezuela
Vietnam
Based on
All
Android
Arch
CentOS
CRUX
Debian
Debian (Stable)
Debian (Testing)
Debian (Unstable)
Fedora
FreeBSD
Gentoo
Independent
KDE neon
KNOPPIX
LFS
Mageia
Mandriva
Manjaro
Mint
OpenBSD
OpenSolaris
openSUSE
PCLinuxOS
Puppy
Red Hat
rPath
sidux
Slackware
SliTaz
Solaris
Ubuntu
Ubuntu (LTS)
Tiny Core
Zenwalk
Desktop environment
All
No desktop
AfterStep
Android
Awesome
Blackbox
bspwm
Budgie
Cinnamon
Consort
Deepin
dwm
Enlightenment
Equinox
Firefox
Fluxbox
flwm
FVWM
GNOME
Hackedbox
i3
IceWM
ion
JWM
KDE
KDE Plasma
Kodi
Lesstif
Lumina
LXDE
LXQt
MATE
Maynard
Metacity
Mezzo
Moblin
Openbox
Pantheon
Pearl
pekwm
Ratpoison
Razor-qt
SLWM
Sugar
Trinity
TWM
Unity
WebUI
WMaker
WMFS
WMI
Xfce
Architecture
All
aarch64
acorn26
acorn32
alpha
amiga
arc
arm
armv5tel
armel
armhf
atari
cats
cobalt
dreamcast
emips
evbarm
evbmips
evbppc
evbsh3
ews4800mips
hp300
hp700
hpcarm
hpcmips
hpcsh
hppa
i386
i486
i586
i686
ia64
ibmnws
ix86
luna68k
m68010
m68k
mips
mipsco
mipsel
mvme68k
mvmeppc
news68k
newsmips
ns32k
ofppc
pmax
powerpc
ppc64
ppc64el
prep
ps2
ps3
s390
s390x
sandpoint
sgimips
sh3eb
sh3el
sh5
shark
sparc32
sparc64
sun2
sun3
vax
x68k
x86_64
xbox
zaurus
Package management
All
None/Unknown
DEB
Flatpak
Nix/Guix
RPM
Pacman
PET
Portage
Snap
TGZ/TXZ
Release model
All Fixed Fixed (LTS) Semi-Rolling Rolling
Install media size
All Under 100MB Under 250MB
Under 700MB Under 2000MB Over 2000MB
Install method
All Local Net-Install
OEM
Multi-language support
All Yes/Other No
ar arabic aragonese
az Bengali bg
bn by ca
catalan cn cs
cz da de
dk Dzongkha ee
en es et
eu fa Farsi
fi fo fr
galician gl gr
Gujarati Hausa he
hi Hindi hk
hr hu id
Igbo il in
is ISO it
ja jp ko
kr lt lv
Malayalam ml mn
mr ms nb
Nepali nl nn
no ph pl
po pt pt_br
Punjabi ro rs
ru se si
sk sv Tamil
te Telugu th
tr tw ua
uk valencian vn
Yoruba yu zh
zh_CN zh_TW
Init software
All OpenRC RC
runit S6 systemd
SysV Upstart Not systemd
Other
Status
All Active Dormant Discontinued